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Thursday, December 10

  1. page Bamboo edited ... Photosynthesis Bamboo also plays a key role in balancing oxygen and carbon dioxide in the atm…
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    Photosynthesis
    Bamboo also plays a key role in balancing oxygen and carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. It is able to produce up to 35% more oxygen than an equivalent stand of trees, and is also capable of sequestering up to 12 million tons of carbon dioxide from the air per hectare.
    {3036.jpg} Giant Panda, straight munchin'. Yum
    Animal Diets
    Bamboo is included in the diet of several animals, notably as the cornerstone of the diet of China's Giant Panda, which, while facing extinction, consumes vast amounts of bamboo on a daily basis for the grass's sugar. Bamboo is also eaten by the Mountain Gorillas of Africa in the mountainous regions of eastern Africa, including the countries of Uganda, Rwanda, and the Democratic Republic of Congo in central Africa. Giant bamboo is consumed in large amounts by Golden Bamboo Lemurs, despite the fact that it contains a considerable amount of cyanide.
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    As well as the largest, it is also the strongest growing grass, with the ability to support up to 52,000 pounds per square inch, making it just a bit more durable than mild steel and graphite. This obviously makes for great construction use, both for structures like bridges and scaffolding and for actual buildings themselves, though it is usually used for things like flooring, decking, panelling, and tiling. While, again, mostly associated with Asian cultures, bamboo is also used for construction in a number of places in the South Pacific, most notably in the Tiki culture, which is imitated, though certainly in a tacky way, today throughout the United States.
    Other Facts:
    The bamboo goods industry is expected to be worth $25 billion by 2012.
    The Chinese use bamboo for medicine because of its potassium and protein content.
    Thomas Edison successfully used a carbonized bamboo filament in his first experiments with the light bulb.
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    in 1945 (<http://www.bambootech.org/tslink.asp?subsubid=71&subid=16&sname=MISSION&lid=229>)
    (<www.mauiretreat.com/index.php?section=54>)
    (<http://www.bambootech.org/tslink.asp?subsubid=71&subid=16&sname=MISSION&lid=229>)
    (<http://jingtea.wordpress.com/2009/04/06/my-favourite-food-in-china-or-maybe-the-worldfresh-bamboo-shoots/>)

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    8:49 am
  2. page Bamboo edited ... Human Uses Bamboo is used widely by humans in a number of ways, ranging from culinary purpose…
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    Human Uses
    Bamboo is used widely by humans in a number of ways, ranging from culinary purposes to use for construction materials.
    {fresh-bamboo-shoots.jpg} Fresh bamboo shoots
    Culinary
    Bamboo is used not only as an ingredient in many dishes, but also to make drinks and as utensils or makeshift cookware. The bamboo shoot is used in a number of Asian dishes, and is mostly found in soups or broths with other vegetables, though its specific uses vary from region to region. For example, in Indonesia, the thinly sliced shoots are boiled with thick coconut milk to make a dish called gulia rebung. Sap drawn from young culms of a shoot can be fermented and used to make a sweet wine called ulanzi. In certain parts of India, ingredients are cooked inside the hardened shoots over an open flame.
    {cut-bamboo-cane-200.jpg} The culm of the bamboo shoot, as seen here, is thick, durable, and can be used as a wood-like construction material.
    Construction
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    great construction use. Whileuse, both for structures like bridges and scaffolding and for actual buildings themselves, though it is usually used for things like flooring, decking, panelling, and tiling. While, again, mostly associated
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    cultures, bamboo asis also used for construction tools and itemsin a number of places in the South Pacific, most notably in the Tiki culture, which is imitated, though certainly in a tacky way, today throughout the United States.
    Other Facts:
    The Chinese use bamboo for medicine because of its potassium and protein content.
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    8:37 am
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  5. page Guarana edited ... In the Olympics caffeine has now been taken off the banned list and is now part of a monitorin…
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    In the Olympics caffeine has now been taken off the banned list and is now part of a monitoring program. Guarana on the other hand is still on the banned substance list, because of how it is used to substitute the banned substance ephedrine.
    In the NCAA a few years ago the NCAA presented a listof banned drug classes, including stimulants, anabolic agents, and street drugs. Eventually, the two common ingredients found in energy drinks, guarana and taurine, were banned in 2003. The NCAA monitored the effects of caffeine and eventually declared an athlete is not allowed to have a concentration higher than 15 micrograms per milliliter in their system, or 625 milligrams of caffeine.
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    Hot Chocolate, Soft-Drinks(Kola Nut)Soft-Drinks
    References
    1. http://altmedicine.about.com/od/completeazindex/a/guarana.htm
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    8:18 am
  6. page Guarana edited {http://dietplanstoday.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/03/am_guarana_g.jpg} Guarna Plant with small b…
    {http://dietplanstoday.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/03/am_guarana_g.jpg} Guarna Plant with small bright red fruit and black seeds.
    Guarana (Paullinia cupana)
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    containing about 4-8%4 - 8% caffeine, more
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    containing about 1-2.5%.1 - 2.5%. Besides caffeine
    Botanical Facts
    {http://i.ehow.com/images/GlobalPhoto/Articles/5449529/379934-main_Full.jpg} Paullinia Cupana
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    Finally, chemists have performed toxicity studies on guarana to test if it is toxic. Most studies have only been done on animals that showed guarana to be non-toxic, even at high dosage (2 g/kg of body weight). The same was true when guarana’s first toxicity study was done on a human, of a female that had an existing heart condition.
    History & Domestication
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    treat diarrhea.
    Not until the 1700s the first examination of guarana seeds was performed by Theodore von Martius a German botanist. He isolated a bitter, white crystalline substance which he would name guaranine, which would later be called caffeine. Eventually over a few centuries after the guaranis tribe found its uses, the benefits of guarana would reach explorers and settlers. Specifically in France and Germany in the 1940s, researchers found the Indians’ uses to cure fevers, headaches, cramps, and an energy tonic. The United States found guarana to increase mental alertness, fight fatigue, increase stamina, and physical endurance.
    Today guarana is a well known plant and used worldwide. It is a main ingredient in energy drinks and sodas, but also in the national beverage of Brazil called Guarana Soda. Also today eighty percent of the world’s production of guarana paste is produced in the middle of the Amazon rainforest in northern Brazil by the Guarani Indians.
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    {http://www.edita.jp/groomyz/image/groomyz/guarana-brasil.jpg} {http://www.caffeineguru.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/07/monsterassault.jpg}
    WORLDWIDE ETHNOMEDICAL USES
    Amazonia
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    Table found at http://www.rain-tree.com/guarana.htm
    The Guarana Legend
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    the people. JuruparíJuruparí believed it
    The boy one day went out to gather fruit in the rainforest; Juruparí knew this was the perfect time to end the boy’s life. Juruparí would transform himself into a snake, which bit the boy killing him instantly. The bad news would spread quickly about the boy’s death. Eventually there would be a thunder strike and lightning bolt near the Indians tribe. It was a message from Tupá telling the mother of the boy to plant his eyes saying the planting of his eyes would bring the tribe abundance of fruit and also healing. The mother told the tribe who all listened and planted the boy’s eyes. Finally, there grew the guarana, whose seeds were black with a white aril around it resembling a human eye.
    Guarana use in Sports
    {http://www.piercemattie.com/blogs/NCAA.jpg} {http://olympiads.win.tue.nl/ioi/guides/olympsym.gif}
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    collegiate sport?
    Athletes need to be even more careful now with what they intake, because it could be in the form of a drink sitting on their dinner table. Recently, major sports-governed organizations (Olympic Committee of Anti-Doping and NCAA) have been setting restrictions by creating lists of banned, restricted, and permitted drugs and substances. Each organization varies, but each one now has a restriction on caffeine. The reason for the restriction on caffeine is due to the creation and popularity of dietary supplements and natural or herbal products. These particular products are problematic, because they may contain banned substances that are listed by the botanical name. Guarana (Paullinia cupana) is the most popular herbal product, because of its very high caffeine content. Guarana, because of its high caffeine content has been used in the substitution for ephedrine, a prohibited substance. Now that caffeine has been restricted, according to the Olympic Committee of Anti-Doping in order to test positive for caffeine their urine has to have a concentration greater than 12 micrograms per milliliter or 500 milligrams of caffeine.
    Product
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    Table found at: http://www.guarana.com.au/sports.html
    Examples of Caffeine banned in sports:
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    a problem.”
    In

    In
    the Olympics
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    substance ephedrine.
    In the NCAA a few years ago the NCAA presented a listof banned drug classes, including stimulants, anabolic agents, and street drugs. Eventually, the two common ingredients found in energy drinks, guarana and taurine, were banned in 2003. The NCAA monitored the effects of caffeine and eventually declared an athlete is not allowed to have a concentration higher than 15 micrograms per milliliter in their system, or 625 milligrams of caffeine.
    Interested in other stimulating beverages? Check out these! Coffee, Tea, Hot Chocolate, Soft-Drinks(Kola Nut)
    (view changes)
    8:17 am
  7. page Hot Chocolate edited ... Botanical Info: {http://exhibits.mannlib.cornell.edu/chocolate/images/content_img/ThurstonCac…
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    Botanical Info:
    {http://exhibits.mannlib.cornell.edu/chocolate/images/content_img/ThurstonCacao.jpg}
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    Brachychiton discolor, colaKola nut, Fremontodendron
    Classification:
    Theobroma cacao L.
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    8:17 am
  8. page Tea edited Tea ... Drinks, and Soft-Drinks(Kola Nut) Soft-Drinks, {Camellia_sinensis,I_GABG92.jpg} {…

    Tea
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    Drinks, and Soft-Drinks(Kola Nut)Soft-Drinks,
    {Camellia_sinensis,I_GABG92.jpg} {Camellia_sinensis,I_GABG93.jpg}
    Tea is considered a stimulating beverage because it can contain anywhere between 15mg to 60+mg of caffeine depending on the type of tea. Tea is brewed from the tea plant, known as Camellia sinensis native to Southeast Asia. The top leaves and buds are the parts of the plant which are consumed in tea. Based on various methods of processing tea leaves, the four main teas produced are black tea, green tea, oolong tea, and white tea.
    (view changes)
    8:16 am

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